Explore Tucson’s historic neighborhoods with this new guide | Subscriber

With spring upon us, there’s no better time to go out and admire Tucson’s historic neighborhoods.

The third edition of the Guide to Tucson’s Historic Neighborhoods, a large, fold-out map with the backstory on Tucson’s oldest districts, is now available to the community.

More than 40,000 copies have been distributed since the first edition was published by the Blenman-Elm Neighborhood in 2011.

This edition includes one of the latest neighborhoods to get historic designation, Broadmoor-Broadway Village neighborhood, a subdivision south of Broadway between Country Club Road and Tucson Boulevard.






This edition of the Guide to Tucson’s Historic Neighborhoods includes one of the latest neighborhoods to get historic designation, Broadmoor-Broadway Village neighborhood, a subdivision south of Broadway between Country Club Road and Tucson Boulevard.




From the nomination form for the National Register: “Broadmoor is a large subdivision of 365 single-family houses that was platted in 1944 and was primarily built-out between 1944 and 1964.

“Though many houses have been modified over the years, those modifications have not adversely impacted the overall character of the neighborhood (and) the subdivision is largely intact and retains and expresses its original character.”

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The guide notes the neighborhood was named after an iconic luxury resort in Colorado and was Tucson’s first new subdivision of the post-war development period.

“Homesteaded in 1885, the land was later developed as an 18-hole golf course for the Tucson Golf & Country Club (1914-1937),” the guide says. “The midtown neighborhood, developed between 1944-64, features one of the first cohesive collections of ranch-style homes in Tucson.

“Early planning innovations — including curvilinear streets, medians and landscaping features — alongside a paved pedestrian path and the natural beauty of the Arroyo Chico wash, have kept this neighborhood a bike and walking favorite.”






Blenman-Elm Neighborhood consists of 17 styles of homes popular between the 1920s and the 1950s, a majority of which are ranch style with Spanish revival influences.




Creation of the guide is supported by marketing firm WhyFor Agency and Banner Medical Center and researched by a volunteer committee in conjunction with the city of Tucson Preservation Office, said Hannah Glasston, the editor.

The guide is free and can be obtained at city of Tucson ward offices, public libraries and the Southern Arizona Heritage and Visitor Center in the historic Pima County Courthouse, 115 N. Church Ave.

A copy of the map can also be downloaded at tucne.ws/thnguide.

Contact reporter Gabriela Rico at [email protected]